Jump to content
  • 0
Nima

How to make shisha tobacco at home

Question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

 

Hello my friends!
 
I got the perfect shisha tobacco, and now i will produce this to sell.  If you can like my page on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldSmokeTobacco
 
In the page have a video with my brother smoking my shishsa tobacco the mentol flavor. 
 
A big hug friends. 

 

 

 

I will check it out right now. I'm glad that you figured out the right ratio of glycerin/tobacco/flavor to use. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Those are some nice clouds!. Is your URL working? I clicked it but it took me to a blank page. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hey all! Was kinda read-only for a long time. Now wanted to try making some tobacco myself. Read at some places at honey if heated over 40C (Celsius) gets pretty nasty  (bla bla bla cancer bla bla bla toxic bla bla bla). Any comment on that? Also don't have any vacuum device, just throwing it in a box and mixing once a day should work also :)? About molasses - kinda wasn't able to find it in our shops, maybe it is my problem, maybe they don't stock it. (probably i wasnt able to find one). 

Also about Lorain Oils - how much of that stuff you pour in the process? Thx ! And hello from Estonia :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hey all! Was kinda read-only for a long time. Now wanted to try making some tobacco myself. Read at some places at honey if heated over 40C (Celsius) gets pretty nasty  (bla bla bla cancer bla bla bla toxic bla bla bla). Any comment on that? Also don't have any vacuum device, just throwing it in a box and mixing once a day should work also :)? About molasses - kinda wasn't able to find it in our shops, maybe it is my problem, maybe they don't stock it. (probably i wasnt able to find one). 

Also about Lorain Oils - how much of that stuff you pour in the process? Thx ! And hello from Estonia :)

 

Not sure about the nasty flavor but the consensus is to heat it in the oven at the lowest number possible. I fiddle with my oven knob until I get it lit enough below the 200 mark and put my tobacco at the top rack. I then open the door every 30 minutes to let the heat scape. The whole point of heating it is so that the molasses and/or honey liquifies enough to permeate all the tobacco leaves. 

 

The vacuum device is not necessary but helpful. I usually vacuum seal my tobacco to take all the air out and make sure that the process of letting the leaves absorb the flavors and molasses/honey much faster. I usually let it sit in a container for a few days making sure I mix it up every 12 hours or so if I don't seal it. 

 

When I purchased my molasses and my honey I wanted to make sure I got great quality products. When I had decided to make my own it was during my yearly vacation to myrtle beach so I purchased two containers of pure molasses and honey locally grown. Stuff is so good that a year later I still have about half a bottle left of each even though i also cook with it. I think as far as brand it's really up to you, but for the honey I would make sure to get it in it's purest form possible like from a farm if there's one close enough to you. I'm fortunate? that I live in the middle of hell and I have tons of farms and orchards around me, so if I want fresh honey I can just take a drive to my local farm. 

 

Molasses should be able to come by fairly easy. My local grocery store carries it, but I rather go get it from the same place where I get my honey. 

 

I personally haven't used Lorain Oils yet, but I hear they are the best. The flavors I've used are either Watkins or McCormick which are pretty decent in my opinion but I do use a lot of it. However that also might have to do with the fact that my batches are about 300g of tobacco at a time and then there's the trial and error. If the flavor is not too strong I add more flavoring and let it sit for another day. 

 

Hope that helped with some of your questions. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Damn its hard to find tobacco.... anyway one thing left to get its honey. Molases i still didnt found in any shops .)

Yeah a i got a market near when i can get some fresh honey.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Damn its hard to find tobacco.... anyway one thing left to get its honey. Molases i still didnt found in any shops .)

Yeah a i got a market near when i can get some fresh honey.

 

 

Yeah it's somewhat difficult to get good quality tobacco around me as well, but I can always order it online. The good bags of tobacco I got I picked them up on our last trip to Myrtle Beach. Driving through North Carolina they have a HUGE tobacco, cigars and cigarette store that sells every brand under the sun at a very cheap price. That's where I picked up the good tobacco bags to make my own shisha. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Well i made SOMETHING. It looks and smells good. Anyway - (50gr of tobacco) washed/rinsed/ diried on sun for a while / added honey / mixed/ squeezed / wraped in foil and baked at ~140celsium for 1h. / took out/ burned fingers/ cooled down / added 2 tea spoons of glycerin and 2ml of lorain oil/ put it in a jar. 

So anyway its not as molases sticky... it kinda feel loose. even when you shake the jar its shaking there also. I think i did smth wrong. 

Nope - didnt tried to smoke it yet.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

You can always try smoking a bit to try it out, but that's normal unless you bathe the shisha in honey. Mine is the same way, every loose but it smokes great and it's very heat resilient. I usually smoke it with one coal more than I normally would smoke with. 

The steps you mentioned above is actually the same steps I do without burning my fingers. LOL 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I did a smoke test yesterday.  tangiers pico bowl. 3 tom coco coals. Boom! big ass clouds. And almost no flavor of pina colada. Only when you exale you can taste it a little bit. But the smoke is soft, and tasty :)) (ii think its the honey).... and a very strong tobbaco flavor. (less than zaghoul but a litl bit like it). After that i crushed the coals for small parts - and it went even better. Will do a video in a couple of days.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

yes unfortunately the tobacco flavor will always be there. That's why I wash it as much as I can until the water runs clean, which by the way is the longest process for me. I start to wash it very early during the day and change the water every 30 minutes to an hour and just repeat the process until the water is no longer brown. 

 

As for the flavor you definitely will need to add more of it. Pina colada, banana and vanilla are very light flavors and you will have to add more flavoring until you get it to the point that you want to get it without the tobacco being too wet. 

Cherry is a good flavor that for some reason has been the strongest for me and so is anise which I love. Just remember to use teaspoons of flavoring incrementally but also add glycerin as well so the smoke don't suffer. For example when I add more flavor i use a 2-1 ratio: one teaspoon of glycerin to two teaspoons of flavoring. So far that has worked well for me without the glycerin being so overwhelming that makes me thirsty. 

 

Once you find the recipe you like, it will be much easier to make the next batch. I wrote down on a piece of paper all the attempts I made and now I have the recipe that is just right for me. Heat resilient, TONS of clouds, and great flavor. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hey all! Was kinda read-only for a long time. Now wanted to try making some tobacco myself. Read at some places at honey if heated over 40C (Celsius) gets pretty nasty  (bla bla bla cancer bla bla bla toxic bla bla bla). Any comment on that? Also don't have any vacuum device, just throwing it in a box and mixing once a day should work also :)? About molasses - kinda wasn't able to find it in our shops, maybe it is my problem, maybe they don't stock it. (probably i wasnt able to find one). 

Also about Lorain Oils - how much of that stuff you pour in the process? Thx ! And hello from Estonia :)

Hello! buddy you think if honey heated can do a cancer? and people what use honey in tea, or coffe? hahaha (bal bla bla cancer bla bla bla toxic) ahahhahahah 
 
Boys I made my tobacco, and many people love them ,  how I told to you I want to sell my tobacco, if you can like my page. 
 
I anyone want to taste my tobacco inbox me on facebook. A huge hug!
 

https://www.facebook.com/GoldSmokeTobacco?ref=ts&fref=ts

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hi, everybody!

 

I've read somewhere that you can use banana leaves instead of tobacco to make nicotine-free shisha. Does anyone have any experience/ideas on that?

 

Thank you!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hi, everybody!

 

I've read somewhere that you can use banana leaves instead of tobacco to make nicotine-free shisha. Does anyone have any experience/ideas on that?

 

Thank you!

Welcome to the forum.

 

I do not have any experience with using banana leaves but I do have experience with mint leaves. If it is anything like that then you could very easily follow the steps that are somewhere here in this thread or elsewhere and just swap out normal tobacco leaves with banana leaves. I would however add pieces of banana or even make a banana bowl to really make the flavor pop. 

 

I'm not really the best with this, DD would be much better to ask. Hey DD get in here!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Welcome to the forum.

 

I do not have any experience with using banana leafs but I do have experience with mint leafs. If it is anything like that then you could very easily follow the steps that are somewhere here in this thread or elsewhere and just swap out normal tobacco leafs with banana leafs. I would however add pieces of banana or even make a banana bowl to really make the flavor pop. 

 

I'm not really the best with this, DD would be much better to ask. Hey DD get in here!

 

 

Welcome to the forum llia and thank you for the vote of confidence Chernobyl :) 

 

ok, I personally haven’t tried and I doubt I ever will.  I only say that from my experience growing up cooking with it. Let me explain. 

 

People from the Caribbean as I am, make these things called Pasteles, and they are just like the mexican tamales. Mexicans wrap theirs in corn husk. Us Dominicans we wrap it in banana leafs and boil it. We do this because boiling the “pasteles” with them helps preserve the flavor and the leafs are so strong that the mixture won’t seep through. 

 

In order to make the leafs pliable enough to wrap the “Pastel”, you have to first run the leafs directly over a low flame until it changes color to a darker green. You have to keep moving them or they will burn. 

 

Which brings me to my next point. The leafs burn. If you put direct fire on it when the leafs are green, they will burn and stink. I mean like catch on fire and burn black. So from that experience, I can tell you that smoking it might not be such a pleasant experience. 

 

Well what about dry banana leafs? well, that won’t work either. When the leafs dry up they can be used to start a camp fire. 

When I was little my grandma used to start the stove fire with coals and dry banana leafs. 

 

Fun fact, a hawaiian Kalua (underground oven) uses banana leafs as the lid of the pit. 

 

So from this experience I can deduct that using banana leafs won’t work as a tobacco replacement, they just don’t react the same when heat is introduced to it. 

 

Now with that said, this is only my experience growing up using them in food applications. I can not begin to imagine how one could make that into smokeable shisha, but I am curious. I’m sure it’s not impossible given that brands like hydro herbal actually make their nicotine free shisha from sugar cane shavings. As a matter of fact, The King Shisha uses real fruit, molasses, and chunks of sugar cane that you can actually see is sugar cane. I do have pictures of that in our pubic gallery here: 

 

I did a bit of research and from my understanding, people in the Orient actually make little cigars using banana leafs and nothing else. However there’s a huge difference between a cigar and shisha tobacco. 

 

I’m definitely going to do more research to see what I can find out but as it stands I don’t believe banana leafs can be used to make shisha. Again that’s just my personal opinion from experience with banana leafs. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Welcome to the forum llia and thank you for the vote of confidence Chernobyl :)

ok, I personally haven’t tried and I doubt I ever will. I only say that from my experience growing up cooking with it. Let me explain.

People from the Caribbean as I am, make these things called Pasteles, and they are just like the mexican tamales. Mexicans wrap theirs in corn husk. Us Dominicans we wrap it in banana leafs and boil it. We do this because boiling the “pasteles” with them helps preserve the flavor and the leafs are so strong that the mixture won’t seep through.

In order to make the leafs pliable enough to wrap the “Pastel”, you have to first run the leafs directly over a low flame until it changes color to a darker green. You have to keep moving them or they will burn.

Which brings me to my next point. The leafs burn. If you put direct fire on it when the leafs are green, they will burn and stink. I mean like catch on fire and burn black. So from that experience, I can tell you that smoking it might not be such a pleasant experience.

Well what about dry banana leafs? well, that won’t work either. When the leafs dry up they can be used to start a camp fire.

When I was little my grandma used to start the stove fire with coals and dry banana leafs.

Fun fact, a hawaiian Kalua (underground oven) uses banana leafs as the lid of the pit.

So from this experience I can deduct that using banana leafs won’t work as a tobacco replacement, they just don’t react the same when heat is introduced to it.

Now with that said, this is only my experience growing up using them in food applications. I can not begin to imagine how one could make that into smokeable shisha, but I am curious. I’m sure it’s not impossible given that brands like hydro herbal actually make their nicotine free shisha from sugar cane shavings. As a matter of fact, The King Shisha uses real fruit, molasses, and chunks of sugar cane that you can actually see is sugar cane. I do have pictures of that in our pubic gallery here:

I did a bit of research and from my understanding, people in the Orient actually make little cigars using banana leafs and nothing else. However there’s a huge difference between a cigar and shisha tobacco.

I’m definitely going to do more research to see what I can find out but as it stands I don’t believe banana leafs can be used to make shisha. Again that’s just my personal opinion from experience with banana leafs.

in my opinion i believe it could work because you will be adding honey and or molasses, glycerin, and flavour so that could help with it not burning and regular shisha uses tobacco and that burns easily too
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Whoah! I never expected such a thoughtful and elaborate response! Thank you guys!

 

First, I think that after soaking dried leafs in water and honey I will render them inflammable, steaming at best. And that, I suppose, Is actually a good thing. Second, I am more worried about health-related aspects. I have all the means to test things out, including a fairly high-end professional kitchen, but what are chances of the thing being toxic or whatnot?

 

Anyway. Thank you for your involvement, I think I will move on with actual testing and post results. Hope to hear yours too!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

in my opinion i believe it could work because you will be adding honey and or molasses, glycerin, and flavour so that could help with it not burning and regular shisha uses tobacco and that burns easily too

 

true, and from what I've found so far, there are really no toxins in the leafs when you burn them which makes sense if they are used to cook with. I've also been finding out that some people are using it for their blunts and they can't really tell the difference with the flavor. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Whoah! I never expected such a thoughtful and elaborate response! Thank you guys!

 

First, I think that after soaking dried leafs in water and honey I will render them inflammable, steaming at best. And that, I suppose, Is actually a good thing. Second, I am more worried about health-related aspects. I have all the means to test things out, including a fairly high-end professional kitchen, but what are chances of the thing being toxic or whatnot?

 

Anyway. Thank you for your involvement, I think I will move on with actual testing and post results. Hope to hear yours too!

 

I'm glad you appreciate our responses. Here we like to think we are a very friendly bunch. 

 

As far as toxins, I'm not an expert but I do believe they are harmless given the fact that so many cultures use the leafs to cook with. 

 

Now I'm really curious and I want to get some banana leafs to play around with making my own shisha with it. :) 

Edited by dd0723

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Well, I'm back for some follow up on banana shisha.

1) It works. It needs a lot of work, but it smokes nicely, although not very cloudy. The leafs themselves are harder and sturdier that tobacco and that's what needs to be improved first.

2) We didn't figure out a way to get rid of the grassy flavor yet, but we did reduce it by boiling fresh leafs for some time before drying. We also hid it with vanilla flavoring.

3) A lot of work ahead. I am now researching ways to increase cloudiness and kill the grassiness for good. We are also about to start flavoring trials.

Will report back which further progress.

Would be thankful for you suggestions on decreasing the grassiness. I am going to try boiling leafs in acid, baking soda and lactofermenting them, but I'm fairly sure there's a perfect way to break down those leafs and wash out the grassy flavor.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Also, about heating the mixture and vacuuming. I have a sous-vide setup. Should I vacuum-seal the mixture (before glycerin) and heat it to some degree (90 Celsius probably?) in sous-vide water bath? Or is evaporation important in the heating stage?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Well, I'm back for some follow up on banana shisha.

1) It works. It needs a lot of work, but it smokes nicely, although not very cloudy. The leafs themselves are harder and sturdier that tobacco and that's what needs to be improved first.

2) We didn't figure out a way to get rid of the grassy flavor yet, but we did reduce it by boiling fresh leafs for some time before drying. We also hid it with vanilla flavoring.

3) A lot of work ahead. I am now researching ways to increase cloudiness and kill the grassiness for good. We are also about to start flavoring trials.

Will report back which further progress.

Would be thankful for you suggestions on decreasing the grassiness. I am going to try boiling leafs in acid, baking soda and lactofermenting them, but I'm fairly sure there's a perfect way to break down those leafs and wash out the grassy flavor.

Very interesting, I'm glad that you experimented with it and then came back here to tell us about it. We appreciate that. Did you run the leaves through the fire before you did anything with it? I know it's supposed to make it pliable when you are cooking with it, but I also think that it helps with the grassiness taste. AS far as I can remember we didn't do much to the leaves except runing them through an open flame until they turned dark green. Maybe that will help some. 

Also, about heating the mixture and vacuuming. I have a sous-vide setup. Should I vacuum-seal the mixture (before glycerin) and heat it to some degree (90 Celsius probably?) in sous-vide water bath? Or is evaporation important in the heating stage?

I usually add the glycerin and then vacuum seal it. Basically what I'm trying to do is to just open the package and have it ready to smoke. However that's usually not the case and I end up having to add more glycerin to the mixture after I open it. However after every modification, I let it rest for at least 24 hours to make sure the leaves absorb the extra glycerin. 

I don't believer that evaporation is important at all in the heating stage. That's mostly to break down the molecules in the honey to make it runny and juicy and to open up the tobacco leafs. 

Edited by dd0723

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

hello guys! I'm trying to make good shisha from Virginia tobacco a few days. I'v read up all posts and didn't found the same problem, after boiling/washing and baking with honey/molasses i still have specific tobacco flavor and im not able to clear it, how to solve this stuff? After of few days of experiments i starting think that problem isn't procedure of cooking, problem is Virginia( asap 

Edited by Alex
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 10/15/2015 at 0:53 AM, Alex said:

hello guys! I'm trying to make good shisha from Virginia tobacco a few days. I'v read up all posts and didn't found the same problem, after boiling/washing and baking with honey/molasses i still have specific tobacco flavor and im not able to clear it, how to solve this stuff? After of few days of experiments i starting think that problem isn't procedure of cooking, problem is Virginia( asap 

Hey Alex, I think the issue from what I'm finding out is the length of time you leave the flavor in the tobacco. I was having the same issue with the tobacco undertone, but I think I've solved it in this batch I'm making right now.

I've been letting the tobacco sit in water for a very long time and making sure I change the water every 30 minutes or as often as I can. Once the water is running pretty clear, then I add the flavor and honey or molasses and just let it sit there with the flavor for at least 48 hours. After I let the flavors soak into the leafs, THEN I cook it for about 2 hours at 150. I'm lucky that the stove we have now goes below 200.

Then I let it sit for another 2 days or so making sure that I mix the tobacco with my hand every now and then. So far so good and the smell of tobacco is completely gone. I just have to smoke out of the new batch to see if I was successful.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×